Yesterday's Book Haul

Jul. 29th, 2017 11:41 am
jazzy_dave: (bookish)
[personal profile] jazzy_dave
Despite the topsy turvy weather the other day i ended up with a good haul of books -




(no subject)

Jul. 28th, 2017 06:05 pm
lycomingst: (kerr)
[personal profile] lycomingst
If I didn’t reply to a comment of yours, I apologize. I was struck again with the stomach upset that leaves me with no energy at all. And then politics darkened my mood.

Books I’ve read: Read more... )

Netflix movie Albert Nobbs )

I made bread with rye flour. There was a combination of flours and only ¼ cup of rye but that was the dominant taste. It was pretty good and would make excellent sandwich rolls. I don’t know why I had a sudden yen for rye bread, except maybe because of some very good stuff I bought at Trader Joe’s a while ago. I wish I could find some East Coast rye bread like I had in my youth.

If I never see or hear of O. J. Simpson again, that would be agreeable to me.
jazzy_dave: (bookish)
[personal profile] jazzy_dave
Helen Ellis "American Housewife" (Scribner)




This collection of 12 short stories is chock-full of quirky, creepy, clever women. I can't imagine someone not seeing themselves in at least one of these characters. I read several stories multiple times and plan on reading a few of my favourites again.I think the shortest stories are my favourites -- they pack a big punch in just a couple of pages (especially "Southern Lady Code", "What I Do All Day", and "Take It From Cats").

Some of these stories verge on the absurd and surreal, even through all the exaggerated scenarios, there is also an undeniable truth: I have experienced grocery aisle rage,- and “Hmmm” is most certainly Southern Lady Code for: I don’t agree with you but am polite enough not to rub your nose in your ignorance.


If you like wacky ,funny,and strange stories and if you are interested in the inner lives of women, I highly recommend this book.


jazzy_dave: (Default)
[personal profile] jazzy_dave
Simon Winchester "A Map That Changed the World: The Tale of William Smith and the Birth of a Science" (Penguin)





Here is a book that whilst its subject is science it covers a far wider ground than i had anticipated before reading it.
It's one of those classic 18th century tales where there's science, religion, class, prejudice money and, out of the mess and shambles comes something that is really mind blowing. William Smith produced the first geological survey of the UK. All by himself. And a small version is reproduced on the inside front cover and it's a real thing of beauty.

It's set during that great upheaval in science, when Britain finally moved from being a medieval belief led society to one that valued science, facts, precision, deduction and started wanting to ask questions of the natural world. this is one example. It was driven by his being involved in the coal mining industry, then in the routing and digging of a canal through Somerset. What he'd seen by the vertical descent into the ground of the mines was reinforced by what he'd seen in the cut made across miles of Somerset - the rocks beneath our feet are different, but predictably different in different places.

It's got it's fair share of trials and tribulations, and the class system comes in for a fair old (and entirely justified) bashing, but Smith doesn't always seem to be the most astute of individuals. Even so, it's nice to see that he did finally get the recognition he deserved in his lifetime - even if he seems to have been largely forgotten since. Simon Winchester does write a good story, as well as managing to get some facts to stick in your brain at the same time. I thought this was a good read.

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